Depression

depression
Unless you have suffered from depression, it is nearly impossible to know what it’s really like. Even if you grew up with someone who suffered from it, you don’t know what it’s like to be depressed. You just know what it’s like to live with someone who is depressed.
From the outside looking in, depression looks simple. It looks like a prolonged period of sadness and negativity caused by something obvious or that can be explained. For happy people, it seems like their friend or family member is choosing to let themselves be dragged down by something rather than fighting for their own happiness.
The truth is that depression is so many things and because of this no one understands it. The best neuroscientists in the world still don’t know for sure what causes depression. They don’t know how it works, why it is so different for everyone or how to cure it. Therefore, the only thing you can rely on is how people experience it.
Depression Is Not Choice
If you are not depressed, you might think that depressed people have a choice in the matter. It seems like you can choose whether you want to get over it or fight it. But the truth is that depression is not something you choose. It doesn’t matter if you are strong or privileged – depression can hit you whether it makes sense or not.
Depression Is Not Sadness
Feeling down or sad is not the same as being depressed. Depression affects your whole body. It’s not just your mind that is difficult but your whole body reacts.
An individual suffering from depression said “The worst part of depression is when simple tasks like getting out of bed, going out, eating, sleeping or showering become a mission.”
Life with depression feels less like a gloomy day and more endlessly laborious or futile. Some people struggle to find the mental and physical motivation to get up and go to the bathroom and perform other necessary functions. That is more than just being upset.
When your whole body is telling you “no” almost every single day, you are not just sad. You are depressed. You are not trying to overcome obstacles. You are trying to free climb Everest.
Depression Is a Daily Challenge
Depression is something you wake up with every day.
Certainly, some days are better than others. Not everyone who is depressed feel that every single day drags them down further. Similarly, a single good day will not turn their depression around either. Someone else has said that “The worst part of depression is when you have one good day; people assume you are cured and should be better now. But that’s not how it works.”
So this leads to the question: does depression ever get easier?  The answer is no.
A depression sufferer said “I feel like people often fail to mention the guilt, shame and how doing “simple” tasks as talking to a friend is exhausting, and that not everyone has the energy to wear a mask.”
Depression Is Different for Everyone
Scientists do not know what causes depression in different people. Some reports suggest our increasing use of electronics, such as smartphones, which have already been linked to infertility, are the cause of the disorder. Part of this confusion is because people describe their depression so differently. People experience different symptoms depending on their brains, their personal lives and the kind of depression their facing.
However, there is one thing that most people can agree on and J.K. Rowling says it perfectly:

“Depression is the most unpleasant thing I have ever experienced… It is that absence of being able to envisage that you will ever be cheerful again. The absence of hope. That very deadened feeling, which is so very different from feeling sad. Sad hurts but it’s a healthy feeling. It is a necessary thing to feel. Depression is very different.”

Depression is not about being sad or having a series of bad days. Rather, depression is something that hits you like a truck, sometimes without warning. It is not a mix of sadness or happiness. In fact, for some people, it is the absence of all feeling.
Depression is not a choice because if given the option, no one would willingly choose depression.
 

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2 thoughts on “Depression

  1. Yes, yes, yes, yes, YES. Absolutely nailed it. If there’s one thing I wish people understood about depression, it’s that it’s different for everyone. So many people expect it to look a particular way and often, it doesn’t at all. With me, for example, I could go about my daily life just fine for the most part (until it did eventually get too much) but there was a constant feeling of hatred towards myself, my body and who I am. I had lived with it for so long, I didn’t know any better than to think it was just who I was.
    Sending you lots of love, Leah.
    Ruth | http://www.ruthinrevolt.com

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